Ruminations of J.net idle rants and ramblings of a code monkey

Baton Rouge SQL Saturday/Tech Day 2013

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Once again, I’ll be presenting in Baton Rouge for their Tech Day so I’m busting my butt (actually, keyboard) building the demos and preparing. I’ll be doing two presentations:

Back to Basics: .NET Essentials You May Have Forgotten: I’ve done this one before and it’s been pretty popular and well received. I review a lot of the fundamentals of .NET, the CLR and how it all works … you know, the icky plumbing stuff. It goes over the type system, threading, disposal and a whole bunch more. I built this after doing a lot of tech screens of relatively experienced folks but who didn’t have a good grasp of these fundamentals. When talking about this to other folks, I found that I wasn’t the only one that was running across this. While it’s a testament to the maturity and solidity of the .NET platform that developers can do a lot of really great work without really knowing all of the plumbing, I still (strongly) believe that understanding the underpinnings is vital. Microsoft – and most others – are focused on the new, cool shiny things that are coming out on .NET and no one’s really talking about reviewing the fundamentals very much these days.

StreamInsight in Action: Monitoring Website Performance in Real Time: Yeah, you had to know that StreamInsight would be in there. This is a brand-new presentation that I’m currently building using the StreamInsight.Foundation stuff that’s been published on this blog – so it’ll be my first presentation based on this work. In the process, I’ve found some warts (and fixed them) that will be rolled back in and discussed on the blog after I get done with the presentation. I’ll be focusing on different StreamInsight queries and techniques that allow you to get real-time analytics of site performance, slow pages, navigational analysis and more. By the end of it, I’ll also be integrating performance counter data into the analytics so you can also determine what pages were running when, say, requests queued or CPU utilization spiked.

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